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Scleroderma is a
treatable disease*

*Also treats Rheumatoid Arthritis, Systemic Lupus, Gout, Polymyositis,
and other rheumatic diseases.

ARTIST CREDIT: Paul Klee, the painter, died of scleroderma at aged 53 after WWII.


 

ABOUT Dr. Daniel E. Furst, MD, MACR

Board certified in internal medicine & rheumatology

Dr. Furst is internationally known for his expertise in the research and treatment of scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis. He has specialized in studying how medications react in the body to treat rheumatic diseases. He is a member, master, and Fellow in the American College of Rheumatology. As of 2015, Dr. Furst has published more than 330 book chapters and reviews, 366 peer-reviewed research articles, and edited 17 books including two editions of a textbook on scleroderma (below). He lectures and teaches internationally as well as in the US. Dr. Furst's areas of research interest include rheumatoid arthritis (RA), scleroderma (Ssc) and polymyositis/dermatomyositis.

Systemic Sclerosis (2nd edition) is a comprehensive standard reference on sclerosis written by well-known experts in the field. The book presents a concise overview of the causes of scleroderma, as well as the latest information on the development and diagnosis of the disease. 

APPOINTMENTS - Ask for TY

(310) 297-9221

 

CLINIC ADDRESS

5230 Pacific Concourse Drive, Suite 100
Los Angeles, CA 90045-6200

 

DR. FURST'S CLINIC HOURS

Mon  7 am –  5 pm

Tue   7 am –  5 pm

NEWS/RESOURCES

 

Preliminary data of Cytori Therapeutics’ STAR Phase 3 trial (NCT02396238) demonstrated that the company’s adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) are feasible for the treatment of patients with scleroderma-caused hand dysfunction.

The data will be presented in a poster at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/AHRP on Nov. 15 in Washington, D.C.

Cytori uses human adipose tissue as the raw material to manufacture their cellular therapies. Cytori Cell Therapy comprises a heterogeneous population of specialized cells, including stem, lymphatic, immune, and mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells that can play a role in the healing process of patients with scleroderma-associated hand dysfunction and orthopedic disorders, among other diseases.

The ongoing STAR Phase 3 clinical trial is a placebo-controlled study evaluating the safety and effectiveness of Cytori Cell Therapy (ECCS-50) injected into the fingers of scleroderma patients who have experienced hand dysfunction due to the disease.

The treatment includes harvesting adipose tissue through small volume liposuction to isolate and concentrate ADRCs. The primary endpoint of the trial is the improvement in hand dysfunction up to 48 weeks after treatment as measured by Cochin hand score compared to a placebo. Secondary endpoints of the trial include the study of Raynaud’s syndrome and health-related quality of life.

The poster to be presented at the ACR meeting will describe the clinical procedures adopted in the STAR clinical trial, as well as the clinical characteristics of the 88 patients taking part in the study. Cytori will also present the trial’s preliminary blinded safety results.

“The preliminary data support the feasibility of using Cytori Cell Therapy in scleroderma patients with hand dysfunction,” Dinesh Khanna, MD, MS, lead author of the poster, said in a press release.

Khanna  is the Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor of Rheumatology, a professor of internal medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, and director of the University of Michigan Scleroderma Program.

“We remain focused on continuing execution and completion of the STAR study in the middle of 2017,” added Marc Hedrick, president and CEO of Cytori.

Earlier this year, Cytori reported that the treatment has been well-tolerated by patients in the STAR trial.

STAR follows the pilot study SCLERADEC-I, whose published results were presented at the Systemic Sclerosis World Congress in Lisbon, Portugal, in February 2016 demonstrated that a single dose of ECCS-50 was safe and led to significant improvements in hand function and Raynaud’s syndrome.

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own immune system attacks healthy tissues, resulting in a hardening and tightening of the skin and connective tissues due to excessive collagen deposition. About 90 percent of patients with scleroderma suffer from hand impairment, a condition for which there are currently no approved therapi

 

SCLERODERMA FOUNDATION
If you are newly diagnosed or have even had scleroderma for a while, this website is a source of support, education, advocacy and information about the newest research.  You can sign up for a monthly e-newsletter as well as watch videos of lectures taken from the annual National Conference, and more.  Read more >


SCLERODERMA  |  HOW IT EFFECTS THE BODY
Here is a section that gives an overall, interactive picture of how scleroderma can effect a person's body.  Read more > 

PROGRESS & COLLABORATION IN CLINICAL TRIALS
Education about the work of the FDA.  Read more >


PATIENT CAT DAVIS
A human interest story from Cat Davis, a woman in Spokane, WA, with scleroderma.  Read more >

CLINICAL RESEARCH RESOURCES

The following website is a rich source of information about what clinical research is and what research is being done in scleroderma across the country and the world.  If you would like to become a subject in a study, there are lists of study centers close to you that you can explore.   www.clinicaltrials..gov

Who Cares for My Caregiver? Read more here

 

CLINICAL RESEARCH

Through research and treatment, we are aiming for an eventual cure for this disease.

PROGRESS & COLLABORATION IN CLINICAL TRIALS
Education about the work of the FDA.  Read more > 
 

 

            STUDIES LOOKING FOR PATIENT VOLUNTEERS

             Currently enrolling clinical trials. Read More

            www.scleroderma.org


             The STRATUS Study

            The STRATUS Study for patients with Systemic Scleroderma (SSc). Read More

               


                   INFORMATION FOR SUBJECTS: RESEARCH STUDY 

                                              UCLA

                    Principal Investigator: Suzanne Kafaja, MD

                          Department of Rheumatology

                         1000 Veteran Avenue, 3rd Floor

 

                  Principal Investigator: Daniel E. Furst, MD

                        Pacific Arthritis Associates

                    5230 Pacific Concourse Drive, Suite 100

 

Title:  A phase 2 study to evaluate subcutaneous abatacept vs placebo in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis---a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial.

Sponsors:  UCLA, Pacific Arthritis Associates (Suzanne Kafaja, Daniel E. Furst) and Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS)

The UCLA Division of Rheumatology is looking for people with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc) to participate in a research study.

Eligibility:

  • Diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc)
  • At least 18 years old

The drug used in this study is subcutaneous abatacept (or placebo), which has not been approved by the FDA for the treatment of SSc.  In Part 1 of the study, you will receive treatment with either abatacept or placebo once a week for up to 48 weeks.  In Part 2 of the study, every participant will receive abatacept for up to 24 weeks.

The first abatacept (or placebo) injection will be given in the study clinic during the baseline visit.  You will be trained to give yourself injections under the skin, so you can perform this at home.  You will continue to give yourself an injection of 125 mg. of abatacept (or placebo) once a week up to 48 weeks.  If you continue to participate in Part 2, you will continue to receive abatacept once a week up to 24 more weeks.

After the baseline study visit, you will return to the study clinic for 5 more visits at 1,3,6,9 and 12 months.  If you continue to participate in Part 2, you will be asked to visit the study clinic for 3 more visits at 14, 16, and 18 months.

If you participate in this study you will be reimbursed $50 for each visit (this amount includes parking fees).

To make an appointment with the study doctor to learn about this study, please contact Jeraldine Guzman at 310-825-4744 (UCLA) or Emma Hasan at 310-297-6812 (Pacific Arthritis Associates).


What is a Clinical Study? For more info please click the link below

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/about-studies/learn


Information for PATIENTS

for evaluation, treatment & new information

  • Cutting edge therapy

At our Scleroderma Center, our goal is to provide accurate diagnosis, cutting edge therapy, and follow-up for many aspects of scleroderma, including:

  • Raynauds Phenomenon
  • Skin Ulcer and Calcinosis
  • Skin Tightness and Swelling
  • Lung involvement
  • Heart involvement
  • Kidney
  • Muscles / Tendons
  • Joints
  • Genitalia
  • Psychological

We collaborate with specialists as necessary and welcome family and friends as your support system.

The Scleroderma Center is very active in designing and performing clinical studies to further knowledge about the cause and treatment of scleroderma. We hope this will help bring us closer to a cure. We invite patients to think about participating in one of these studies.

ARTICLE: iNVOLVING PATIENTS AS EQUAL PARTNERS IN RESEARCH.  Read more > 

We collaborate with your other doctors and with UCLA specialists, Dr. Clements and Kafaja, as well as all other UCLA, UCI, and San Diego physicians.

The Next Steps Forward in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Research | Anaheim  Dr. Furst presenting the closing keynote address, titled "The Next Steps Forward in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Research." Dr. Furst is the first Carl M. Pearson Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Medical Center.

22 Points to consider for clinical trials in systemic scelrosis

 

Stem cell research news

APPOINTMENTS - ask for ty

(310) 297-9221

 

CLINIC ADDRESS

5230 Pacific Concourse Drive, Suite 100
Los Angeles, CA 90045-6200

 

DR. FURST'S CLINIC HOURS

Mon  7 am –  5 pm

Tue   7 am –  5 pm

Information for HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

 

SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS ARTICLE
Excellent, overall review.  Read more > 

ADIPOSE TISSUE FOR BLOOD VESSELS
Early, interesting, methodology.  Read more >